Three CDs. By 1965, the British R&B boom was over. Cyril Davies was dead, Alexis Korner was employed as MD on a children's TV show, and the legion of young acolytes the two men had inspired had drifted away from the blues and into mainstream pop stardom. The more "purist" individuals were out in the cold: Brian Jones was marginalized in the Stones by the emergence of the Jagger/Richards songwriting team, while Eric Clapton had stormed out of the most blues wailing Yardbirds in protest at their recording of winsome pop ditty 'For Your Love'. But things were about to change. In April 1966, club band John Mayall's Blues Breakers - prominently featuring a still-simmering Clapton - recorded their debut studio album with the aid of producer Mike Vernon. Released in July, the LP was a huge, entirely unexpected success, reaching the UK Top Ten and remaining in the charts for an impressive 17 weeks. Suddenly, an astonishing number of virtuoso young British (and Irish) blues guitarists, all of whom rejected the trappings of pop success as fervently as the young Eric, were inspired to form their own bands. In the wake of Clapton, his Yardbirds replacement Jeff Beck and Peter Green (Eric's replacement in Mayall's band after he'd split to form Cream) came the likes of Kim Simmonds, Jeremy Spencer, Stan Webb, Paul Kossoff, Alvin Lee, Clem Clempson, Rory Gallagher, Gary Moore and Mick Ronson. Within a year or two of Mayall's unexpected breakthrough, the second wave of the British blues boom was in full, glorious bloom. Featuring all of the above names, Crawling Up A Hill chronicles the development of the British blues scene during that relatively brief but halcyon period, covering both the electric blues bands (Mayall's Blues Breakers, Fleetwood Mac, Chicken Shack, Savoy Brown, Ten Years After etc) and the acoustic country blues acts (Jo-Ann Kelly, Mike Cooper, Ian A. Anderson and others). In addition, we feature a number of more obscure bands from the era, including Levee Camp Moan (responsible for two of the most feverishly-collected albums of the era), pre-Faces outfit Quiet Melon and The Zany Woodruff Operation, now receiving their first-ever public exposure. Housed in a clamshell box with a 40-page booklet featuring potted histories and priceless period photos of all the featured acts, Crawling Up A Hill is a fascinating document of a genre that, though relatively short-lived, would have a seismic influence on the subsequent development of rock music.
Three CDs. By 1965, the British R&B boom was over. Cyril Davies was dead, Alexis Korner was employed as MD on a children's TV show, and the legion of young acolytes the two men had inspired had drifted away from the blues and into mainstream pop stardom. The more "purist" individuals were out in the cold: Brian Jones was marginalized in the Stones by the emergence of the Jagger/Richards songwriting team, while Eric Clapton had stormed out of the most blues wailing Yardbirds in protest at their recording of winsome pop ditty 'For Your Love'. But things were about to change. In April 1966, club band John Mayall's Blues Breakers - prominently featuring a still-simmering Clapton - recorded their debut studio album with the aid of producer Mike Vernon. Released in July, the LP was a huge, entirely unexpected success, reaching the UK Top Ten and remaining in the charts for an impressive 17 weeks. Suddenly, an astonishing number of virtuoso young British (and Irish) blues guitarists, all of whom rejected the trappings of pop success as fervently as the young Eric, were inspired to form their own bands. In the wake of Clapton, his Yardbirds replacement Jeff Beck and Peter Green (Eric's replacement in Mayall's band after he'd split to form Cream) came the likes of Kim Simmonds, Jeremy Spencer, Stan Webb, Paul Kossoff, Alvin Lee, Clem Clempson, Rory Gallagher, Gary Moore and Mick Ronson. Within a year or two of Mayall's unexpected breakthrough, the second wave of the British blues boom was in full, glorious bloom. Featuring all of the above names, Crawling Up A Hill chronicles the development of the British blues scene during that relatively brief but halcyon period, covering both the electric blues bands (Mayall's Blues Breakers, Fleetwood Mac, Chicken Shack, Savoy Brown, Ten Years After etc) and the acoustic country blues acts (Jo-Ann Kelly, Mike Cooper, Ian A. Anderson and others). In addition, we feature a number of more obscure bands from the era, including Levee Camp Moan (responsible for two of the most feverishly-collected albums of the era), pre-Faces outfit Quiet Melon and The Zany Woodruff Operation, now receiving their first-ever public exposure. Housed in a clamshell box with a 40-page booklet featuring potted histories and priceless period photos of all the featured acts, Crawling Up A Hill is a fascinating document of a genre that, though relatively short-lived, would have a seismic influence on the subsequent development of rock music.
5013929186804

Details

Format: CD
Label: GRPF
Rel. Date: 04/03/2020
UPC: 5013929186804

Crawling Up A Hill: Journey Through The British Blues Boom 1966-1971 / Various
Artist: Crawling Up A Hill Journey Through British Blues
Format: CD
New: Available to Order $32.99
Wish

Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. All Your Love - John Mayall's
2. Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton
3. Crawling Up A Hill - The Zany Woodruff Operation
4. Louise - Anderson Jones Jackson
5. I Love You - The Graham Bond Organization
6. I'm A Man (Live) - The Yardbirds
7. Don't Want You No More - The Spencer Davis Group
8. I Can't Keep From Crying, Sometimes - Ten Years After
9. Jumping At Shadows (Demo Version) - Duster Bennett 1
10. Charlie - The Deviants 1
11. You Shook Me - Jeff Beck 1
12. Ain't Nothin' In Ramblin' - Jo-Ann Kelly 1
13. Love That Burns - Fleetwood Mac 1
14. Wang Dang Doodle - Love Sculpture 1
15. Operator - Alexis Korner Featuring Robert Plant 1
16. Can Blue Men Sing The Whites? - The Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band 1
17. Walking - Dr. K's Blues Band 1
18. Little Woman You're So Sweet - Shakey Vick 1
19. A Stranger In Your Town -The Climax Chicago Blues Band 2
20. Lord Of The Rings - Downliners Sect 2
21. Sweet Tooth - Free 2
22. Death Letter - Mike Cooper 2
23. Blister On The Moon - The Taste 2
24. I Just Can't Keep From Crying - Levee Camp Moan 2
25. Sometime Girl - Sam Apple Pie 2
26. Skin Game (Live) - John Dummer Blues Band 2
27. Diamond Joe - Quiet Melon 2
28. Nobody By My Side - Killing Floor 2
29. Dear Jill - Blodwyn Pig 3
30. There's An Easy And A Hard Way Of Living - Icarus 3
31. Tears In The Wind - Chicken Shack 3
32. Bring It On Home - Bakerloo 3
33. The Same For You - Jaklin 3
34. Train Comes, Train Goes - Frozen Tear 3
35. Telephone Blues (Aka Talk To Me Baby) - The Rats 3
36. Madison Blues - Angel Pavement 3
37. It's You I Miss - Christine Perfect Band 3
38. This Love Of Old - Medicine Head 3
39. Baby Please Don't Go - Jasper 4
40. I've Got Those Fleetwood Mac Chicken Shack John Mayall Can't Fail Blues - Liverpool Scene 4
41. Ride With Your Daddy Tonight - Brunning Sunflower Blues Band 4
42. Time To Move - Red Dirt 4
43. A Hard Way To Go (Live) - Savoy Brown 4
44. Mean Blues - Jeremy Spencer 4
45. Chauffeur - Black Cat Bones 4
46. Gardener Man - Siren 4
47. Dupree Blues - Blue Blood 4
48. Passing Through - Steamhammer 4
49. Raining In Your Heart - Stone The Crows 5
50. Old Gopher - Edgar Broughton Band 5
51. Roadrunner - Stack Waddy 5
52. Take Me Down To The Water - Heavy Jelly 5
53. The Man Who Never Was - Skid Row 5
54. Take Your Money - Brett Marvin ; The Thunderbolts 5
55. The Sun Is Shining - Mungo Jerry 5
56. Backlash Blues - Linda Hoyle 5
57. Railroad - Status Quo

More Info:

Three CDs. By 1965, the British R&B boom was over. Cyril Davies was dead, Alexis Korner was employed as MD on a children's TV show, and the legion of young acolytes the two men had inspired had drifted away from the blues and into mainstream pop stardom. The more "purist" individuals were out in the cold: Brian Jones was marginalized in the Stones by the emergence of the Jagger/Richards songwriting team, while Eric Clapton had stormed out of the most blues wailing Yardbirds in protest at their recording of winsome pop ditty 'For Your Love'. But things were about to change. In April 1966, club band John Mayall's Blues Breakers - prominently featuring a still-simmering Clapton - recorded their debut studio album with the aid of producer Mike Vernon. Released in July, the LP was a huge, entirely unexpected success, reaching the UK Top Ten and remaining in the charts for an impressive 17 weeks. Suddenly, an astonishing number of virtuoso young British (and Irish) blues guitarists, all of whom rejected the trappings of pop success as fervently as the young Eric, were inspired to form their own bands. In the wake of Clapton, his Yardbirds replacement Jeff Beck and Peter Green (Eric's replacement in Mayall's band after he'd split to form Cream) came the likes of Kim Simmonds, Jeremy Spencer, Stan Webb, Paul Kossoff, Alvin Lee, Clem Clempson, Rory Gallagher, Gary Moore and Mick Ronson. Within a year or two of Mayall's unexpected breakthrough, the second wave of the British blues boom was in full, glorious bloom. Featuring all of the above names, Crawling Up A Hill chronicles the development of the British blues scene during that relatively brief but halcyon period, covering both the electric blues bands (Mayall's Blues Breakers, Fleetwood Mac, Chicken Shack, Savoy Brown, Ten Years After etc) and the acoustic country blues acts (Jo-Ann Kelly, Mike Cooper, Ian A. Anderson and others). In addition, we feature a number of more obscure bands from the era, including Levee Camp Moan (responsible for two of the most feverishly-collected albums of the era), pre-Faces outfit Quiet Melon and The Zany Woodruff Operation, now receiving their first-ever public exposure. Housed in a clamshell box with a 40-page booklet featuring potted histories and priceless period photos of all the featured acts, Crawling Up A Hill is a fascinating document of a genre that, though relatively short-lived, would have a seismic influence on the subsequent development of rock music.